Blogger Backgrounds

Anguish Asylum

House of Shock

Haunt World

Friday, September 17, 2010

Ghost Adventures

The wait is finaly over.... The new season of Ghost Adventurs starts tonight on the travel channel.

The GA Crew travels to Gettysburg, PA, site of the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. While there, they attempt to make contact with dead soldiers, the sadistic woman who ran the town's orphanage and the ghosts of children she abused.

Sunday, September 12, 2010

Eureka Cemetery

While at the Eureka city Cemetery we did get some EVP work (those are being processes and will be posted soon).

One of the more interesting things that happened was near an old mausoleum belonging to John and Jessie Freckleton….

We were sensing something around us and our EMF meter began to spike. Now as always you have to take that for what its worth (However there were no electrical sources around the mausoleum).

When people are exposed to EMF fields they often feel dizzy or light headed…..and we were sensing something.
Some believe that spirits give off EMF emissions when communicating, and others argue that they use EMF to communicate. Either way when you get EMF spikes that can be an indicator of paranormal activity.


Our little band of paranormal investigators made our way out to the small (nearly ghost town) of Eureka Utah.

Eureka was originally known as Ruby Hollow before it developed into a bustling mining town. Incorporated as a city in 1892, Eureka became the financial center for the Tintic Mining District, a wealthy gold and silver mining area in Utah and Juab counties. The district was organized in 1869 and by 1899 became one of the top mineral producing areas in Utah. Eureka housed the "Big Four" mines—Bullion Beck and Champion, Centennial Eureka, Eureka Hill, and Gemini-and later the Chief Consolidated Mining Company.

Eureka's role as the central financial point for the district ensured its survival. It housed business establishments, financial institutions, local and county governmental buildings including Eureka City Hall (1899) and a Juab County Courthouse (1892), various churches, and the meeting places for numerous labor, social, and fraternal organizations. Mining entrepreneurs such as John Q. Packard, John Beck, Jesse Knight, Walter Fitch Sr., and others loomed as important figures in Eureka and Tintic history. In 1979 Eureka was placed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Tintic Mining District Multiple Resource Area, recognizing the importance of remaining buildings and sites

Sunday, September 5, 2010

Devils Night

The night before Halloween, October 30th, has traditionally been a night of pranks and mischief in much of the Midwest and some of the northeastern United States, as well as some parts of Canada. Devil's Night in Detroit can probably be traced back to mid-1880s Ireland, where the night of mischief was originally attributed to fairies and goblins. In the United States, the holiday morphed into a night of soaping windows and toilet papering (a verb) trees. In other words, October 30th was the “trick” to Halloween’s “treat” and gave suburban kids a night of rebellion and anarchy.

Mischief on October 30th

Region to region, the night has different names, but the activities remain very much the same: ringing doorbells, egging cars, dumping rotten produce and setting a bag of poop on fire. Camden, New Jersey calls the holiday Mischief Night, while other parts of New Jersey call it Cabbage Night. Cincinnati, Ohio calls it Damage Night, while other parts of Ohio call it Beggar’s Night. In other regions of the United States, it is known as Doorbell Night, Trick Night, Corn Night, Tick-Tack Night and Goosey Night. In Canada, it is known as either Gate Night or Matt Night.

Southwestern United States Doesn't Celebrate

As wide spread as the phenomenon seems to be, many parts of the United States, most notably states in the south and west, never heard of it and apparently reserve all their mischievous hijinks for Halloween.

Devil's Night in Detroit

In Detroit and much of Michigan, the night is known infamously as Devil’s Night, a moniker now eternally linked with widespread arson. Devil’s Night was once, however, just a different name for more of the same: mischief. In spite of the notoriety of Devil’s Night, Detroit is not the only region to experience an escalation from pranks to arson on October, 30th. Camden, New Jersey had its own period of Mischief-Night-related arson in the 1990s that easily rivaled Detroit’s.

Angel's Night

While Detroit ended the arson, as well as the more innocent mischief, through neighborhood patrols and simply changing the name from Devil’s Night to Angel’s Night, much of the United States still celebrates some type of prank-riddled night on October 30th. Miss the innocent side to the holiday in Detroit? Maybe a few local kids can help you out by decorating your yard with a few rolls of Charmin Spring Bounty toilet paper.


Friday, September 3, 2010

Shadow People

What are Shadow People, or shadow ghosts?? (This article has some good explinations)

Those who are experiencing and studying the shadow people phenomenon say that these entities almost always used to be seen out of the corner of the eye and very briefly. But more and more, people are beginning to see them straight on and for longer periods of time. Some experiencers testify that they have even seen eyes, usually red, on these shadow beings.

The mysterious sightings have become a hot topic of conversion in paranormal chat rooms, message boards and websites, and it is given widespread attention on paranormal talk radio.

What are shadow people and where do they come from? Several theories have been offered.


The explanation we get from skeptics and mainstream science - and who are usually people who have never experienced the shadow people phenomenon - is that it is nothing more than the active human imagination. It's our minds playing tricks on us... our eyes seeing things in a fraction of a second that aren't really there - illusions... real shadows caused by passing auto headlights, or some similar explanation. And without a doubt, these explanations probably can account for some if not many experiences. The human eye and mind are easily fooled. But can they account for all cases?


To call these entities ghosts demands first a definition of what we mean by ghosts. But by almost any definition, shadow people are somewhat different than ghost phenomena. Whereas ghost apparitions are almost always a misty white, vaporish or have a decidedly human form and appearance (very often with discernable "clothing"), shadow beings are much darker and more shadow-like. In general, although the shadow people often do have a human outline or shape, because they are dark, the details of their appearance is lacking. This is in contrast to many ghost sightings in which the witness can describe the ghost's facial features, style of clothing and other details. The one detail most often noted in some shadow being sightings are their glowing red eyes.


The dark countenance and malevolent feelings that are often reported in association with these creatures has led some researchers to speculate that they may be demonic in nature. If they are demons, we have to wonder what their purpose or intent is in letting themselves be seen in this manner. Is it merely to frighten?


Thursday, September 2, 2010

Brains Anyone?

Nothing says “Happy Halloween” like a nice plate of brains and nothing compliments a Zombie Party like brains….after all most zombies are misunderstood. They don’t want to hurt you; they just want to eat your brains!

We found this awesome jello mold at, but most Halloween stores will carry these.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

El Dia De Lost Muertos

Here is some information on El Dia De Los Muertos…The Day of The Dead. This is the Mexican tradition for what we call Halloween!

At first glance, the Mexican custom of El Día de los Muertos — the Day of the Dead — may sound much like the U.S. custom of Halloween. After all, the celebration traditionally starts at midnight the night of Oct. 31, and the festivities are abundant in images related to death.

But the customs have different origins, and their attitudes toward death are different: In the typical Halloween festivities, death is something to be feared. But in el día de los muertos, death — or at least the memories of those who have died — is something to be celebrated.

El día de los muertos, which continues until Nov. 2, has become one of the biggest holidays in Mexico, and celebrations are becoming more common in areas of the United States with a large Hispanic population. Its origins are distinctly Mexican: During the time of the Aztecs, a monthlong summer celebration was overseen by the goddess Mictecacihuatl, the Lady of the Dead. After the Aztecs were conquered by Spain and Catholicism became the dominant religion, the customs became intertwined with the Christian commemoration of All Saints' Day on Nov. 1.

Specifics of the celebration vary with region, but one of the most common customs is the making of elaborate altars to welcome departed spirits home. Vigils are held, and families often go to cemeteries to fix up the graves of their departed relatives. Festivities also frequently include traditional foods such as pan de muerto (bread of the dead), which can conceal a miniature skeleton.


Punch Bowl Idea's

Ok, ok, ok…..I don’t usually put much stock in Martha Stewart…But I will admit that her Halloween show (and magazine) does have some pretty good ideas for your Halloween parties.Here is a cool punch bowl idea that comes from the Martha Stewart website (

Ice Face and Hands How-To

1. Using duct tape, tape up all of the mask's orifices, such as the nostril holes, inside and out. Place the mask face-down in the plastic container, stabilizing the mask in place with the packing material.

2. Using the food coloring, dye about 3 cups of water light green (this should require only about one drop of the coloring). Pour the mixture into the mask, filling it about halfway.

3. Lay the gummy worms as desired around the head of the mask, creating Medusa's hair and using clothespins to hold them in place. Freeze the mask, at least overnight.

4. To create the hands, fill the latex gloves with water (one glove holds about 1 1/2 cups water, so you'll need about 3 cups for both). Using rubber bands, tie the gloves at the wrists to seal them shut. Place the hands flat on a sheet pan covered with parchment paper, to prevent them from sticking. Freeze the hands, at least overnight.

5. Remove the mask from the container, remove the face from the mask mold, and remove the hands from the gloves. (They should come out easily, but if not, place the hands and face in another container filled with room-temperature water to loosen them from the molds.) Turn the face upside-down to reveal the green face with worm hair.

6. Prepare the punch of your choice (Martha uses lemonade and ginger ale), gently slide the face into the punch, and add the hands -- one on each side, palms facing up.